Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List

I love a good list. LOVE. THEM. A few years ago, I covered our kitchen chalkboard in this epic Summer Bucket List.

That was two years ago and it was perfect for the sort of summer I wanted for my kids. They were the perfect age to go DO ALL THE THINGS! No more diaper bags. Everyone could make it through the day without a nap. I had just left a job where I had been working full-time, outside of my house and I felt like I was missing out.

It was time to pack in the fun!

 

And we did. It was so great and I’m so glad we did it.

But as my kids have gotten just a bit older, I’m ready to shift gears a little bit.

To shift from “Entertainment Director” to “Life Coach.”

It sounds so boring, right?

As if I’ll be asking my kids to spend the summer grinding their own wheat and beating their clothes on rocks to clean them.

Here me out.

For the last few years, the “Summer Bucket List” or “Holiday Fun List” has been a study in my ability to conduct expert Google searches for entertainment and activities and “must see” events.

But I’ve noticed that we’re tip-toeing into a world where my kids arise from bed every morning wondering what wonderful thing we’ve prepared for them today. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of wonderful things. BIG. FAN. (Just went to Disneyland, so I’m not trying to pretend I’m not all about the magic.) But I’m also a big believer in boredom as a creativity booster.

Also; there are no Entertainment Directors when you’re a grown up. Life is not always a non-stop party and I want my kids to learn these critical skills:

  1. Connecting with people.
  2. Finding the joy in everyday things.

 

I decided to rethink our Summer Bucket List.

Instead of “what should we do?” I asked “what do I want to get out of this summer?”

  • Quality time and connection.
  • Practice skills for a happy life.
  • Practice being a big kid.

This shift means that instead of a long list of ticketed activities, I’ve got a summer bucket list that looks something like this:

Teach the kids “slow fun.”

Screen-free old school fun; puzzles, board games, cards, reading in the shade. If you don’t bust out the board games, how are your kids going to learn the art of trash-talking, or how darn smart their Grandpa is, or how sneaky their Grandma can be. My kids come from a long-line of card players—they need to be properly trained. Those are the moments that connect you to your family and reinforce how to have fun, without a screen.

Spend time with our extended family.

Sunday BBQ’s, cook with Grandma, camping and visits with our extended family. Traditions are built one Sunday, and one summer at a time. More people knowing, loving, and enriching the lives of my kids is a good thing.

Connection to the neighborhood.

Knock on doors, use up all the sidewalk chalk, share our popsicles. Those are the things that really belong on a summer bucket list. I’m not setting up “playdates” or texting to make arrangements to play. They need to figure this stuff out.

Appreciation and exposure to the outdoors.

Hike, go to the lake, hit the bike trail, post-dinner walks to the park, dinner picnics in the mountains. We are lucky to live 25 minutes away from straight-up wilderness, we should be taking advantage of it more.

Room to be creative with their time!

Protect downtime and provide open access to craft supplies and the blanket fort box. “Boredom” breeds some of the most entertaining creative play I’ve ever had the privilege to eavesdrop on. 

Learn a few routines and responsibilities.

Standard chores, help with big projects, work for hire. I’ve not been consistent with chores and now sometimes my kids simply walk away from their dinner plate and, OH HECK NO, that’s not going to work for me. Or for them in the long term.

Skills for a happy life.

Cooking nutritious meals, eating outside, watching sunsets, sitting on the porch and enjoying a bowl of ice cream after dinner. Yes, I realize most of those revolve around food. But food is an absolutely GLORIOUS part of life and I want my kids to be able to cook delicious food for themselves one day.

To try new things and challenge ourselves.

Try the climbing gym. Try a slack line. Train for the next Taekwondo tournament. My kids are well out of that window where everything is new and hard and takes so much work to master—remember when we were pumped when our kids learned to walk? I want them to have a chance to be a beginner again. Brave is a muscle. You have to use it to keep it.

Do FUN Things with our tribe.

Meet our friends at the food truck park. Take a small army of moms and kids to the lake. Driveway fireworks party with the neighbors. Family is wonderful, but the family you pick? Those people are magic.

Serve others.

Think of ways to help, surprise, and dish up joy to the friends, family, and even strangers in our lives. Learn how good it feels to do something because you know that someone is going to feel special because of your efforts.

So, maybe this isn’t the big dazzling summer bucket list you were hoping for when you clicked on this post, but I’m looking forward to a summer of spending less; less money, less time on screens, and less time hustling.

And getting more;

More quality time together.
More feeling like I’m helping raise my kids into wonderful adults.
More memories with the people we love.

There is such a huge benefit for kids when families can focus their energy and finances on experiences over things. (Kalli wrote a fantastic post about this around Christmas time. Go read it.)

Other posts you might enjoy…

Planning a Family Vacation? When Should You Begin?

10 Tips for a Stress-Free Family Road Trip

On the Ugly Business of Comparison: A Letter to Us Moms

The post Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List appeared first on TodaysMama.

Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List

I love a good list. LOVE. THEM. A few years ago, I covered our kitchen chalkboard in this epic Summer Bucket List.

That was two years ago and it was perfect for the sort of summer I wanted for my kids. They were the perfect age to go DO ALL THE THINGS! No more diaper bags. Everyone could make it through the day without a nap. I had just left a job where I had been working full-time, outside of my house and I felt like I was missing out.

It was time to pack in the fun!

 

And we did. It was so great and I’m so glad we did it.

But as my kids have gotten just a bit older, I’m ready to shift gears a little bit.

To shift from “Entertainment Director” to “Life Coach.”

It sounds so boring, right?

As if I’ll be asking my kids to spend the summer grinding their own wheat and beating their clothes on rocks to clean them.

Here me out.

For the last few years, the “Summer Bucket List” or “Holiday Fun List” has been a study in my ability to conduct expert Google searches for entertainment and activities and “must see” events.

But I’ve noticed that we’re tip-toeing into a world where my kids arise from bed every morning wondering what wonderful thing we’ve prepared for them today. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of wonderful things. BIG. FAN. (Just went to Disneyland, so I’m not trying to pretend I’m not all about the magic.) But I’m also a big believer in boredom as a creativity booster.

Also; there are no Entertainment Directors when you’re a grown up. Life is not always a non-stop party and I want my kids to learn these critical skills:

  1. Connecting with people.
  2. Finding the joy in everyday things.

 

I decided to rethink our Summer Bucket List.

Instead of “what should we do?” I asked “what do I want to get out of this summer?”

  • Quality time and connection.
  • Practice skills for a happy life.
  • Practice being a big kid.

This shift means that instead of a long list of ticketed activities, I’ve got a summer bucket list that looks something like this:

Teach the kids “slow fun.”

Screen-free old school fun; puzzles, board games, cards, reading in the shade. If you don’t bust out the board games, how are your kids going to learn the art of trash-talking, or how darn smart their Grandpa is, or how sneaky their Grandma can be. My kids come from a long-line of card players—they need to be properly trained. Those are the moments that connect you to your family and reinforce how to have fun, without a screen.

Spend time with our extended family.

Sunday BBQ’s, cook with Grandma, camping and visits with our extended family. Traditions are built one Sunday, and one summer at a time. More people knowing, loving, and enriching the lives of my kids is a good thing.

Connection to the neighborhood.

Knock on doors, use up all the sidewalk chalk, share our popsicles. Those are the things that really belong on a summer bucket list. I’m not setting up “playdates” or texting to make arrangements to play. They need to figure this stuff out.

Appreciation and exposure to the outdoors.

Hike, go to the lake, hit the bike trail, post-dinner walks to the park, dinner picnics in the mountains. We are lucky to live 25 minutes away from straight-up wilderness, we should be taking advantage of it more.

Room to be creative with their time!

Protect downtime and provide open access to craft supplies and the blanket fort box. “Boredom” breeds some of the most entertaining creative play I’ve ever had the privilege to eavesdrop on. 

Learn a few routines and responsibilities.

Standard chores, help with big projects, work for hire. I’ve not been consistent with chores and now sometimes my kids simply walk away from their dinner plate and, OH HECK NO, that’s not going to work for me. Or for them in the long term.

Skills for a happy life.

Cooking nutritious meals, eating outside, watching sunsets, sitting on the porch and enjoying a bowl of ice cream after dinner. Yes, I realize most of those revolve around food. But food is an absolutely GLORIOUS part of life and I want my kids to be able to cook delicious food for themselves one day.

To try new things and challenge ourselves.

Try the climbing gym. Try a slack line. Train for the next Taekwondo tournament. My kids are well out of that window where everything is new and hard and takes so much work to master—remember when we were pumped when our kids learned to walk? I want them to have a chance to be a beginner again. Brave is a muscle. You have to use it to keep it.

Do FUN Things with our tribe.

Meet our friends at the food truck park. Take a small army of moms and kids to the lake. Driveway fireworks party with the neighbors. Family is wonderful, but the family you pick? Those people are magic.

Serve others.

Think of ways to help, surprise, and dish up joy to the friends, family, and even strangers in our lives. Learn how good it feels to do something because you know that someone is going to feel special because of your efforts.

So, maybe this isn’t the big dazzling summer bucket list you were hoping for when you clicked on this post, but I’m looking forward to a summer of spending less; less money, less time on screens, and less time hustling.

And getting more;

More quality time together.
More feeling like I’m helping raise my kids into wonderful adults.
More memories with the people we love.

There is such a huge benefit for kids when families can focus their energy and finances on experiences over things. (Kalli wrote a fantastic post about this around Christmas time. Go read it.)

Other posts you might enjoy…

Planning a Family Vacation? When Should You Begin?

10 Tips for a Stress-Free Family Road Trip

On the Ugly Business of Comparison: A Letter to Us Moms

The post Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List appeared first on TodaysMama.

Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List

I love a good list. LOVE. THEM. A few years ago, I covered our kitchen chalkboard in this epic Summer Bucket List.

That was two years ago and it was perfect for the sort of summer I wanted for my kids. They were the perfect age to go DO ALL THE THINGS! No more diaper bags. Everyone could make it through the day without a nap. I had just left a job where I had been working full-time, outside of my house and I felt like I was missing out.

It was time to pack in the fun!

 

And we did. It was so great and I’m so glad we did it.

But as my kids have gotten just a bit older, I’m ready to shift gears a little bit.

To shift from “Entertainment Director” to “Life Coach.”

It sounds so boring, right?

As if I’ll be asking my kids to spend the summer grinding their own wheat and beating their clothes on rocks to clean them.

Here me out.

For the last few years, the “Summer Bucket List” or “Holiday Fun List” has been a study in my ability to conduct expert Google searches for entertainment and activities and “must see” events.

But I’ve noticed that we’re tip-toeing into a world where my kids arise from bed every morning wondering what wonderful thing we’ve prepared for them today. Don’t get me wrong, I’m a big fan of wonderful things. BIG. FAN. (Just went to Disneyland, so I’m not trying to pretend I’m not all about the magic.) But I’m also a big believer in boredom as a creativity booster.

Also; there are no Entertainment Directors when you’re a grown up. Life is not always a non-stop party and I want my kids to learn these critical skills:

  1. Connecting with people.
  2. Finding the joy in everyday things.

 

I decided to rethink our Summer Bucket List.

Instead of “what should we do?” I asked “what do I want to get out of this summer?”

  • Quality time and connection.
  • Practice skills for a happy life.
  • Practice being a big kid.

This shift means that instead of a long list of ticketed activities, I’ve got a summer bucket list that looks something like this:

Teach the kids “slow fun.”

Screen-free old school fun; puzzles, board games, cards, reading in the shade. If you don’t bust out the board games, how are your kids going to learn the art of trash-talking, or how darn smart their Grandpa is, or how sneaky their Grandma can be. My kids come from a long-line of card players—they need to be properly trained. Those are the moments that connect you to your family and reinforce how to have fun, without a screen.

Spend time with our extended family.

Sunday BBQ’s, cook with Grandma, camping and visits with our extended family. Traditions are built one Sunday, and one summer at a time. More people knowing, loving, and enriching the lives of my kids is a good thing.

Connection to the neighborhood.

Knock on doors, use up all the sidewalk chalk, share our popsicles. Those are the things that really belong on a summer bucket list. I’m not setting up “playdates” or texting to make arrangements to play. They need to figure this stuff out.

Appreciation and exposure to the outdoors.

Hike, go to the lake, hit the bike trail, post-dinner walks to the park, dinner picnics in the mountains. We are lucky to live 25 minutes away from straight-up wilderness, we should be taking advantage of it more.

Room to be creative with their time!

Protect downtime and provide open access to craft supplies and the blanket fort box. “Boredom” breeds some of the most entertaining creative play I’ve ever had the privilege to eavesdrop on. 

Learn a few routines and responsibilities.

Standard chores, help with big projects, work for hire. I’ve not been consistent with chores and now sometimes my kids simply walk away from their dinner plate and, OH HECK NO, that’s not going to work for me. Or for them in the long term.

Skills for a happy life.

Cooking nutritious meals, eating outside, watching sunsets, sitting on the porch and enjoying a bowl of ice cream after dinner. Yes, I realize most of those revolve around food. But food is an absolutely GLORIOUS part of life and I want my kids to be able to cook delicious food for themselves one day.

To try new things and challenge ourselves.

Try the climbing gym. Try a slack line. Train for the next Taekwondo tournament. My kids are well out of that window where everything is new and hard and takes so much work to master—remember when we were pumped when our kids learned to walk? I want them to have a chance to be a beginner again. Brave is a muscle. You have to use it to keep it.

Do FUN Things with our tribe.

Meet our friends at the food truck park. Take a small army of moms and kids to the lake. Driveway fireworks party with the neighbors. Family is wonderful, but the family you pick? Those people are magic.

Serve others.

Think of ways to help, surprise, and dish up joy to the friends, family, and even strangers in our lives. Learn how good it feels to do something because you know that someone is going to feel special because of your efforts.

So, maybe this isn’t the big dazzling summer bucket list you were hoping for when you clicked on this post, but I’m looking forward to a summer of spending less; less money, less time on screens, and less time hustling.

And getting more;

More quality time together.
More feeling like I’m helping raise my kids into wonderful adults.
More memories with the people we love.

There is such a huge benefit for kids when families can focus their energy and finances on experiences over things. (Kalli wrote a fantastic post about this around Christmas time. Go read it.)

Other posts you might enjoy…

Planning a Family Vacation? When Should You Begin?

10 Tips for a Stress-Free Family Road Trip

On the Ugly Business of Comparison: A Letter to Us Moms

The post Read This Before You Make Your Summer Bucket List appeared first on TodaysMama.

Where to Stay in South Iceland with Kids

Hotel RangaHotel Ranga (Courtesy Hotel Ranga)

South Iceland has so much to offer families on the go – hiking trips, horseback riding, hot springs, lava lakes, glaciers, volcanoes, dips in waterfalls, rivers and lakes. Winter visitors will enjoy seeing the Northern Lights while summer visitors get daylight until wee hours of the night.

Alas, the perfect trip to Iceland requires the perfect place for you and your family to rest your heads. If you’re headed to South Iceland with the kids, you’re in luck. There are accommodations of all kinds. From hotels to bed & breakfasts, Icelandic innkeepers know how to keep families happy with everything from homemade bread to hot tubs to free Wifi. Whether you’re staying in the heart of Reyjakavik, nearby in Reykjanes, near Mt. Hekla or the Eyjafjallajökull glacier, there are options galore from budget to deluxe.

Here’s a list of five family-friendly places to stay in South Iceland:

Grand Hotel Reykjavik – Reykjavik

Grand Hotel Reykjavik
Grand Hotel Reykjavik (Courtesy Grand Hotel Reykjavik )

If you’re looking for a quiet hotel close to the city center in Reykjavik, look no further than the four star Grand Hotel. It offers comfort, convenience and good service with its 311 rooms, many of which are family-sized with three double beds and a sleeper couch. Amenities include a small fridge, free Wifi, a coffee machine and best of all, plenty of space for the kids to play. Their breakfast buffet is convenient before a full day of touring. The hotel is close to Laugardalur Sports and Recreational Park where kids can go for a swim, and offer a free shuttle to the center of town.

Northern Light Inn – Grindavik

Northern Light Inn
Northern Light Inn (Courtesy Northern Light Inn)

For a place to stay right near Keflavik Airport and the Blue Lagoon (it’s literally next door), the Northern Light Inn is a convenient, cozy choice. The hotel offers 32 rooms with down comforters, geo-thermal heating, free Wifi, and satellite TV. The central living room offers a fireplace and a comfy aea to play and hang out in. Max’s Restaurant offers Nordic cuisine with a selection of foods from the fjords and fields of Iceland, including a kid’s menu. They also offer free transfers to and from the airport and a viewing platform to watch the northern lights.

Frost and Fire Hotel – Hveragerdi

Frost and Fire Hotel
Frost and Fire Hotel (Courtesy Frost and Fire Hotel)

Just outside Reyjakavik sits a beautiful guesthouse called Frost and Fire, with bubbling geothermal springs in a town called Hveragerdi. With 22 rooms, several family-sized and all uniquely furnished with specially made pottery and furniture, the guesthouse is run by locals who add interesting touches that make the stay special. Touches include homemade bread made in an outside oven and other home-cooked food, one pool and two hot tubs, a steam room, 40 TV channels, toys and games. The restaurant is excellent, offering plenty of options for kids, and there is a plethora of activity in the area including jeep tours, fishing, snorkeling, biking, river rafting and more. All rooms include bathrobes, slippers and DVD players. Wi-Fi is free.

A10 Deluxe Bed & Breakfast – Keflavik

In the heart of Keflavik is a charming B&B called A10 Deluxe, just five minutes from the airport. Families can request a cozy triple or quadruple with a private bathroom. The rooms are tastefully decorated and designed for comfort with up-to-date, antique furnishings. Linens and towels are provided, as are free Wifi, bathrobes, a coffee maker and other amenities. Guests can enjoy a common area where breakfast is served daily, as well as access to an outdoor hot tub. The owners are on hand to answer questions and their rates are very affordable.

Hótel Rangá – Hella

Hotel Rangá is well-situated just 96 km from Reykjavík, 8 km from the Hella village on Road 1. The 4-star, luxurious hotel provides stunning, picturesque surroundings, such as Mt. Hekla, Eyjafjallajökull glacier and the Westman Islands within a reach. They offer 51 luxurious and cozy rooms in various price ranges, including their renowned continental suites, decorated and themed after several exotic continents, and a master royal suite. Amenities include flatscreen TV, free Wifi, bath robes and slippers, 24 hour room service, a coffee machine, laundry and wake up service. Baby cots are available upon request. They have a new Astronomical Observatory kids will love for star gazing and access to dog sledding trips, a favorite for kids.

Holly Rosen Fink of The Culture Mom contributed this to MiniTime. She is the founder of Pivoting Media who blogs about her love of culture and travel.

 

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Insider Guide: London

Breathtaking Resorts in Nicaragua to Add to Your Bucket List

Best Things to Do with Kids in Istanbul

10 Places You Absolutely Need to Visit While the Kids are Young

1-hawaii

With just eighteen summer holidays to look forward to as parents, it’s important to think very carefully about where you’re going to spend each one. It may be easy to spend your family vacation in your beach home or at the local amusement park, but it pays to think outside your comfort zone and think about places you absolutely need to visit while the kids are still young.

If you’re looking for that big “Aha!” moment with your kids and want to leave permanent travel marks on their memory, there are vacation spots that are worth considering, both here and abroad. Here are our ten family-friendly vacation ideas you absolutely must consider before your kids grow up.

The Hawaiian Islands

Everyone dreams about a trip to Hawaii. The Hawaiian Islands offer kids of all ages the trip of a lifetime – beautiful beaches with snorkeling off the coast, surfing and boogie boarding, lovely ocean breezes, local culture, sublime sunsets, mountain hikes, horseback riding, luaus and perfect weather. Family excursions include trips to historical and natural sites like Pearl Harbor, hiking Hawaii Volcanoes National Park, swimming in lagoons or embarking on a trip down Maui’s celebrated Road to Hana. Whether you choose Oahu, Maui, Kauai or the Big Island, this is a vacation not soon to be forgotten.

Galapagos Islands

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A trip to the Galapagos Islands, a UNESCO World Heritage site 600 miles off the Ecuadorean coast, is ideal for wildlife-loving families. The active volcanoes have a diversity of wildlife that can’t be matched – from sea lions to marine iguanas to penguins. It’s also known as the place that helped to spawn Charles Darwin’s theory of natural selection, giving its islands mythical status. Kids can swim with sea lions, snorkel with turtles and meet friendly iguanas, providing one memorable experience after another.

Rome

Rome is a great place to visit with kids, as is all of Italy. Italians love children and they will often stop to ogle at babies and young children. Rome is also a great starting point if you’re planning to tour Italy. If you’re planning to visit the Vatican, make a reservation or hire a walking tour guide. Also be mindful of the time of year, as the crowds can get very heavy, and climb the Cupola. When you’re done, tour the Colosseum and Forum, the Pantheon, Santa Maria del Popolo, Campo di Fiori, Piazza Navona, and take your kids to see Michelangelo’s Pietà in St. Peter’s and the Trevi Fountain. Let kids run around the city’s open piazzas or in Villa Borghese, and indulge in several scoops of gelato every chance you get.

Walt Disney World

No list of this nature is legitimate without Walt Disney World on it. It’s got the excitement of the rides, characters, fireworks, and magic. Kids truly want nothing else than to visit Orlando’s Disney parks. It’s not the cheapest trip in the world, but there are times of the year to visit that are less crowded and expensive, like between Thanksgiving and Christmas. Spread out the sights over the course of your vacation, setting aside time for the Magic Kingdom, Animal Kingdom, Epcot and Disney’s Hollywood Studios, as well as a few character meet & greets and the water parks. You’ll love the look on your little girl’s face when she meets Elsa from Frozen in person.

San Diego

3-sandiego

San Diego offers a lush, scenic coastline with sandstone cliffs, pristine beaches and sea caves, as well as perfect weather and a plethora of memorable attractions. Families can spend a full day at the San Diego Zoo, one of the best and biggest zoos in the world, observing pandas, polar bears, elephants, and other amazing animals. Lego fans will love a visit to LEGOLAND® California’s 50+ rides, shows and attractions. SeaWorld San Diego remains one of San Diego’s biggest tourist draws and is known all over the world over as the home of Shamu, a famous killer whale. At the San Diego Zoo Safari Park, kids can get up close and personal to live animals in habitats that mimic their natural ones, from Africa to Asia. When you have time to spare, the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim is not too far of a drive.

New York City

New York City has been called the greatest city on earth, and some would agree. A trip to the top of the Empire State Building will solidify that point of view, as kids will balk at the impressive views from 102 floors above. Afterwards, head west to TKTS and book half-price tickets to a popular Broadway show. The combination is definitely one for the memory books. Another day, take a stroll around NYC’s natural gem, Central Park. Add a trip to the Natural History Museum, the largest natural museum in the world that houses more than 30 million artifacts including dinosaur skeletons and the Rose Center for Earth & Space, and a visit to the Metropolitan Museum of Art to see their incredible Egyptian collection. After a day of culture, history and sightseeing, indulge in a delicious pizza pie, the ultimate, classic NY cuisine.

Yellowstone National Park

Yellowstone National Park, the world’s first national park, is on a lot of family’s bucket lists. It’s easy to see why with its breathtaking 2.2 million acres, most of it wilderness, with an abundance of mammals including bison, wolves and bears, a geyser called Old Faithful, hot springs, canyons and waterfalls. Whether you go camping or stay in a lodge, the experience of seeing one of the greatest wonders of the world is bonding and unforgettable for the entire family.

Paris

4-paris

It’s easy to fill up an itinerary for a memorable family vacation in Paris. At the Eiffel Tower, kids will not only love aerial views of the City of Lights but they will also love the journey to the top. Kids will also appreciate Parisian art, best viewed at the Louvre and D’Orsay. Other must-do activities include a trip to the Notre-Dame Cathedral, a walk down Champs-Elysees, a visit to Montmartre, a Seine river cruise, and a visit to royal, stately parks such as Champ de Mars and Jardin de Luxembourg. The magic of Paris is simply roaming the streets, sampling the crepes and chocolate croissants, shopping at flea markets, sitting in cafes, and people-watching.

Washington D.C.

Washington D.C. is an American city that demands a visit with the kids. It has a dose of history every which way you look and, even better, most attractions are free. The Smithsonian Museums offer free educational experiences for impressionable minds – from the National Museum of Natural History to the National Air & Space Museum. You can inspire your future news anchor at the Newseum or gaze at pandas at the National Zoo. From the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument to the Thomas Jefferson Memorial in the National Mall, both parents and children will have ample opportunities to share their knowledge about past U.S. Presidents and history.

Greece

5-greece

Greece has so much to offer traveling families. It’s the birthplace of Western civilization, hence offering a rich history and plethora of sacred sites. Greek mythology tales will thrill your children along the way, and for older kids studying history, a Greek vacation is ideal for bringing their studies to life. It’s also awe-inspiring in its beauty, with its Mediterranean coastline. Whether you choose to island hop or stay in one place, you’ll have sandy beaches with crystal-clear waters ripe for snorkeling, rocky coves, ruins, olive groves, nature reserves, delicious cuisine, water parks, beaches and swimming pools. Its capital has plenty to keep children busy – from the Acropolis and beyond, where kids can retrace ancient history.

 

Holly Rosen Fink of The Culture Mom contributed this to MiniTime. She is the founder of Pivoting Media who blogs about her love of culture and travel.

 

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